break


break
break VERB (past broke; past part. broken) 1) separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain. 2) make or become inoperative; stop working. 3) interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course). 4) fail to observe (a law, regulation, or agreement). 5) crush the strength or spirit of. 6) surpass (a record). 7) succeed in deciphering (a code). 8) make a sudden rush or dash. 9) lessen the impact of (a fall). 10) suddenly make or become public. 11) (of a person's voice) falter and change tone. 12) (of a boy's voice) change in tone and register at puberty. 13) (of the weather) change suddenly, especially after a fine spell. 14) (of a storm) begin violently. 15) (of dawn or a day) begin as the sun rises. 16) use (a banknote) to pay for something and receive change. 17) make the first stroke at the beginning of a game of billiards, pool, or snooker.
NOUN 1) an interruption, pause, or gap. 2) a short rest or pause in work. 3) an instance of breaking, or the point where something is broken. 4) a sudden rush or dash. 5) informal an opportunity or chance. 6) (also break of serve or service break) Tennis the winning of a game against an opponent's serve. 7) Snooker & Billiards a consecutive series of successful shots. 8) a short s olo in jazz or popular music.
break away — Cf. ↑break away
break one's back (or neck) — Cf. ↑break one's neck
break the back of — Cf. ↑break the back of
break cover — Cf. ↑break cover
break down — Cf. ↑break down
break in — Cf. ↑break in
breaking and entering — Cf. ↑breaking and entering
break into — Cf. ↑break into
break a leg! — Cf. ↑break a leg!
break of day — Cf. ↑break of day
break off — Cf. ↑break off
break out — Cf. ↑break out
break out in — Cf. ↑break out in
break someone's serve — Cf. ↑break someone's serve
break up — Cf. ↑break up
break wind — Cf. ↑break wind
break with — Cf. ↑break with
give someone a br eak — Cf. ↑give someone a br eak
DERIVATIVES breakable adjective.
ORIGIN Old English.

English terms dictionary. 2015.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Break — (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Break — (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • break — vb Break, crack, burst, bust, snap, shatter, shiver are comparable as general terms meaning fundamentally to come apart or cause to come apart. Break basically implies the operation of a stress or strain that will cause a rupture, a fracture, a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • break — [brāk] vt. broke, broken, breaking [ME breken < OE brecan < IE base * bhreg > BREACH, BREECH, Ger brechen, L frangere] 1. to cause to come apart by force; split or crack sharply into pieces; smash; burst 2. a) …   English World dictionary

  • break — / brāk/ vb broke / brōk/, bro·ken, / brō kən/, break·ing, / brā kiŋ/ vt 1 a: violate transgress break the law …   Law dictionary

  • break — [n1] fissure, opening breach, cleft, crack, discontinuity, disjunction, division, fracture, gap, gash, hole, rent, rift, rupture, schism, split, tear; concepts 230,757 Ant. association, attachment, binding, combination, fastening, juncture break… …   New thesaurus

  • Break — (br[=a]k), n. [See {Break}, v. t., and cf. {Brake} (the instrument), {Breach}, {Brack} a crack.] 1. An opening made by fracture or disruption. [1913 Webster] 2. An interruption of continuity; change of direction; as, a break in a wall; a break in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • break-up — break ups also breakup 1) N COUNT: usu N of n, n N The break up of a marriage, relationship, or association is the act of it finishing or coming to an end because the people involved decide that it is not working successfully. Since the break up… …   English dictionary

  • break up — {v.} 1. To break into pieces. * /The workmen broke up the pavement to dig up the pipes under it./ * /River ice breaks up in the spring./ 2. {informal} To lose or destroy spirit or self control. Usually used in the passive. * /Mrs. Lawrence was… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • break up — {v.} 1. To break into pieces. * /The workmen broke up the pavement to dig up the pipes under it./ * /River ice breaks up in the spring./ 2. {informal} To lose or destroy spirit or self control. Usually used in the passive. * /Mrs. Lawrence was… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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